Silvia Puchovska Be Flexible
Welcome to Nomad Week, a ten part series revealing the adventures, knowledge and travel tips from experienced digital nomads located all across the globe. I recently reached out to some of the best in the industry to get their perspectives on world travel and the digital nomad life. This week we share their stories with you. Real nomads. Real stories. Find all ten interviews here.

Silvia Puchovska is originally from Slovakia. Now she is a digital nomad and perpetual traveler, constantly on the move. Silvia helps small business owners clarify and prepare their structured marketing plan focused on content and social media so they can grow their business smoothly.

Where are you living now?
Canggu, Bali

How long have you been there?
8 months

What’s your favorite thing about the city?
I love Canggu because of it’s creative community of people from all around the world, friendly locals and great waves.

What’s your LEAST favorite thing about the city?
I dislike hipster motorcyclists who drive too fast and make noise, the garbage and all the traffic on the “famous” shortcut.

Is there a little known fact about the city people might find interesting?
Canggu is growing very fast, it’s in a constant change, so be prepared to get used to it quickly and take it as an exciting rather than annoying fact.

Where is your favorite place you’ve ever lived and why?
This is a very hard question to answer, because I don’t have one favorite place to live. I loved my time in New York City because it opened my mind to the world and inspired me to travel. In Europe I love Berlin and Copenhagen because both cities are very cool and inspiring. When it comes to beach life I like Bali, El Salvador and Puerto Escondido in Mexico.

What is your LEAST favorite place you’ve ever lived and why?
My least favorite place was Aalborg in the northern part of Denmark. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a lovely place, but for me it was too boring.

What was the EASIEST country you’ve ever visited (i.e. easiest immigration, easiest to open a local bank account, etc)?
The easiest country to organize everything when it comes to moving and living there was Denmark.

Have you ever had any problems in a country? (i.e. immigration issues, getting robbed, etc.)
I have never experienced any immigration problems. I was robbed in Slovakia, Denmark, Germany and Chile.

Do you prefer one region of the world over another, and why?
I love Latin America because of the language, culture and food. South America has amazing nature and Central America has great beach life and surfing.

Is there anything that would make you settle down and stop traveling as much?
I take it as it goes. I used to travel much faster. Now I prefer to travel slow. There might be a day when I find a place somewhere in Mexico and I will stay there for a long time.

Who has been the most influential person on your travels (someone that encouraged you to start, or someone who has influenced you along the way)?
Great question! I’ve been traveling or living in different places for four years now. I was very fortunate to meet people who inspired me and encouraged me to travel more. I remember that when I started my first trip in South America, I met a man in Chile who read my cards and he told me that my life was changing and I would travel for a long time. He was right 🙂

If you were coaching a new nomad, what would you recommend they do to get started?
As a nomad you have to be very flexible and open to new situations, people and habits. Don’t get upset easily, being away from your family can be very challenging.

What country would you recommend a new nomad go to FIRST?
Portugal or Canary Islands

What is one country that you have not been to but is high on your list, and why?
Brazil! I’ve been all over South and Central America but I skipped Brazil. Brazil seems to be a country with positive people, many things to see and beautiful music.

What was the most unexpected surprise you ever encountered as a nomad?
The most unexpected surprise was how hard it was to say goodbye to people who I met along the way or here in Bali. Although I’m used to saying goodbye now, it still surprises me how hard it is.

What was the biggest mistake you made that other nomads can learn from?
My biggest mistake was that I haven´t been planning my finances in a better way, e.g. not having a travel and savings account, not using a proper bank card for traveling or not collecting miles for flying.

How do you meet new people while living the nomad lifestyle? Do you ever get lonely?
I do get lonely, but less lonely than when I’m in my “old environment” where everybody has a very different lifestyle. I choose places where similar people go, so we are all keen to meet new people, e.g. in co-working spaces, work or social events, parties or even when surfing.

To learn more about Silvia and her business, visit her website Unboxing Traveller.

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Andrew Henderson

Andrew Henderson

Andrew Henderson is the world's most sought-after consultant on legal offshore tax reduction, investment immigration, and global citizenship. He works exclusively with six- and seven-figure entrepreneurs and investors who want to "go where they're treated best". He has been researching and actually doing this stuff personally since 2007.
Andrew Henderson

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